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RFID Basics


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With Wristbands, you no longer have to deal with messy ink stamps or a tacky ID card strung around your neck like the metaphorical noose it is! Not anymore! Wristbands are cool and conspicuous. They can also be given different colour coordination, i.e., any number of layers of access relating to a single event can be added with different colours and materials that will add to the security levels.


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RF Physics & RFID: A Brief Overview

RFID systems, like all systems involving energy, are governed by the laws of physics. Physics is the study of matter and its motion through space and time, along with related concepts such as energy and force. To delve deeper, RFID systems also are subjected to fundamental electromagnetic principles. These principles speak to the transfer of energy and the electromagnetic spectrum, are defined in Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic induction and Lenz’s Law. In addition, governments and military departments regulate the use of the electromagnetic spectrum (frequency and power of transmission) in various parts of the world, which leads to different standards and regulations governing RFID systems.

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1. Holt-Cat Tracking for Tool Maintenance

Problem: Holt-Cat’s Machine Division is in charge of maintaining tens of thousands of tools ranging in price from a few dollars up to $18,000. With 16 separate facilities in the state of Texas, the movement of these tools without proper tracking was resulting in loss of money and employee productivity.

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What is RFID attendee tracking?

RFID attendee tracking systems use the benefits of RFID technology to gather business intelligence at events like trade shows, conferences, corporate functions, and other large gatherings. RFID provides the visibility and metrics needed for validated decision making before, during, and after events.

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Even with a perfect RFID hardware configuration, the success of the entire system depends on the ability to obtain a consistent read from your RFID tags. With zero visibility of your assets, all of your planning and testing will go to waste if the RFID tags are not properly affixed to materials. Here are thirteen tips to help you successfully deploy RFID tags in the field.

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Mounting or embedding RFID tags on metal is a tricky proposition for the uninformed, and the informed for that matter. Metal surfaces reflect energy emitted from RFID readers and create interference for RFID tag antennas, which means the tag isn’t able to receive power and transmit information; however, specific RFID tags will work around metal surfaces. RFID companies have patented technology that allows RFID to work when attached to metal surfaces and even embedded within metal products. As long as you choose the correct RFID equipment for your situation and application, you won’t need to worry about interference from metal.

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LF, HF, and UHF

Similar to how a radio must be tuned to different frequencies to hear different channels, RFID tags and readers have to be tuned to the same frequency in order to communicate. 

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In supply chain management, overall success is tied to specific measurements. Successfully managed supply chains are able to achieve 99% traceability, 99% visibility, 99% efficiency, and 99% accountability. Achieving such goals can be nearly impossible using manual processes.

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Firmware is a piece of software that is programmed into the non-volatile memory of a device. This software provides control, monitoring, and data manipulation of engineered products. Depending on the type of device, the firmware could be responsible for simple commands like controlling LED lights, or more complex actions like monitoring complex internal items like oscillators.

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Middleware is a layer of software created to connect other components together – e.g. hardware components, software programs, enterprise applications, databases, etc. Middleware gives software developers the ability to communicate and manage data throughout an entire system, rather than on each individual application. RFID middleware goes beyond simply connecting devices; rather, it allows users to collect, manipulate, and disseminate data with ease.

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RFID Printers are designed to save time for mass printing and encoding applications. These devices are basically an RFID reader and a printer combined into one machine. UHF, HF, and NFC tags are all able to run through an RFID printer, as long as the tag is compatible with that specific printer. The RFID reader inside serves as both the encoder and the verifier for all tags that pass through the unit as it reads and then encodes the tags with the new information and then zebra-printerre-reads the tags before they are released in order to verify that the tag has the correct, new information.


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The chipset, or integrated circuit (IC), houses these four memory banks and is where all the data is stored. Some chipsets have different bit allocations between the four banks to allow for more user memory or a longer EPC number. Each chipset is unique, but the same basic principles apply to all.

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Low Frequency RFID

Low Frequency (LF) RFID is a band on the radio frequency spectrum that typically operates between 125 kHz and 134 kHz. Technically, LF applications can operate on a larger bandwidth from 30 kHz to 300 kHz; however, the specific band varies from country to country and depends on frequencies set aside for radio and marine life tracking.

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The RFID technologies can be integrated into exceptional devices that support most of the applications including asset management, parking control, and animal tracking etc.

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